“Caitlin Doyle writes highly original poems . . .

Drawing by Thomas Thorspecken

steeped in both meaning and musicality . . . whether she is constructing in free verse or in more traditional forms, Doyle’s surprising creations use ‘sound as a doorway to sense’ . . . Doyle’s poems are serious and complex, but also witty and playful, and it’s this tension that makes her writing so innovative . . . although she is a poet and not a fiction writer, she shares Flannery O’Connor and Faulkner’s Southern-gothic flair for unsettling (sometimes comic) domestic scenes. The Brontë sisters, Isak Dinesen’s tales, and Christina Rossetti’s “Goblin Market” also spring to mind, for in Doyle’s modern-day rhymes, there are most certainly goblins lurking in the forest and madwomen hiding in the attic.”  Gwarlingo [more]

“Caitlin Doyle’s poetry moves effortlessly from wit                                      to profundity …

a tonal range matched by a remarkable breadth of technical ability…” Apostrophe Cast [more]

“Thirteen,” by Caitlin Doyle is such a                                remarkable…

combination of ideas and word-play around the transformations to a girl in her thirteenth year that it is like a socks-on-carpet spark to the brain.” Erik Richardson, from a review of Best New Poets [more]

“Doyle’s devotion to musicality . . .

Drawing by Thomas Thorspecken

is the edifice of her poetry… she uses rhyme as a device to puncture the expectations of the physical world… producing work both cosmopolitan and mythic… Doyle’s poems, whether playful or serious in tone, always possess layers of complexity that reward multiple readings… Doyle’s technical approaches vary widely, and so do her subjects and tones… She examines history, popular culture, and personal experience, all with equal commitment and depth… For Doyle, formal considerations and rhythmic effects exist in a rich and complicated relationship to one another …” From Emerging Poets to Watch [more]

“Much has been made of her work                                                               with rhyme and wordplay….

Drawing by Thomas Thorspecken

which she employs to heighten the ominousness of her subjects… But something more complex than wordplay is at work… Her true aim is something different, and serves a specific purpose: to examine the merits and dysfunctions of faux worlds (call them self-delusion, fantasy, or simply nothingness) that haunt and displace traditional realities… as in the darkly wonderful “If Siegfried and Roy Had Never Met,” which creates for the two performers an alternate narrative… In the ominous “Ocean City,” a similar dichotomy edges the dueling shores, one festooned with false idols of commerce, the other all too real… These mirror images bleed together, Escher-like and unsettling… Doyle is keenly attuned to the haunting counterparts to the authentic . . .” from Doyle and the Ersatz Life [more]

“Among established poets . . .

from Ireland’s literati, such as Séamus Heaney, Gerard Smyth, Bernard O’Donoghue, Gabriel Fitzmaurice, William Wall and Matthew Sweeney, one of the new voices is that of Irish-American Caitlin Doyle, an emerging poet who has published widely in America . . .” from The Irish Examiner [more]

“The annual faculty reading is one of Boston’s most                       distinguished literary events. . .

… Where can you find a three-time US poet          laureate, the poetry critic for The New Yorker, and three acclaimed novelists, along with two literary newcomers, each in possession of a highly original voice, all on the same stage? … Doyle, currently the writer-in-residence and a teacher at Interlochen Arts Academy in Michigan, plans to read from her work-in-progress poetry collection, Tea in Eden…” from “BU Literary Lions Read Tonight” in BU Today [more]

“I found the narrative persona in these poems to be                                               playful and inventive…”

… this is a narrator who responds actively to the world and uses imagery to challenge seemingly ordinary things … in the very first poem, the narrator has so much fun using language to recreate sound effects, which are recreated sounds… clever, sure, but it’s also a sly meditation on how artistry can seem more meaningful and true than reality . . .”                                                        Judge’s commentary, WC & C Scholarship Competition [more]

“Readings by two acclaimed young writers . . .

New York poet Caitlin Doyle (featured in Best New Poets 2009, edited by Kim Addonizio), and award-winning South African poet/journalist Henk Rossouw . . .” Distant Voices Poetry Festival [more]

“Caitlin Doyle’s poetry combines technical mastery . . .

with intellectual complexity and emotional verity…” YSL Writer’s Spotlight

“Doyle employs a subtle sonic sensitivity . . .”

Karen Alenier, BPR Lit Trip [more]